As a Matter of Routine

by Pete Karman
Central CT Chapter
April 30th, 2001

In regard to the recent incidents in Peru and China, it should be remembered that:

  • As a matter of routine, the U.S. flies spy planes off the coast of China and in the middle of Peru.
  • As a matter of routine, the U.S. flies spy planes near and over lots of countries.
  • As a matter of routine, the U.S. spies in lots of ways, from satellites to secret agents, on just about every country on earth.
  • As a matter of routine, the U.S. maintains 800 military bases in every corner of the earth.
  • As a matter of routine, the U.S. trains and advises the militaries and police forces of scores of countries.
  • As a matter of routine, the U.S. sells more weapons to more countries than any other country.
  • As a matter of routine, the U.S. maintains the most expensive and extensive military in the world.
  • As a matter of routine, the U.S. government and the corporate media refer to the above as "protecting U.S. interests."
  • As a matter of routine, these "interests" have earned for America the enmity of most of the world, which our media translates as envy.
  • As a matter of truth, these "interests’’ can be more accurately defined as an economic empire, also the most expensive and extensive the world has ever seen. This empire is characterized by giant multinational corporations, multinational meaning that they owe no particular allegiance to any country, let alone the U.S.
  • As a matter of honesty, it’s also accurate to describe this empire as one whose enormous costs are borne by ordinary Americans, but whose vast profits are enjoyed by the wealthiest few. This empire can thus be described as a splendid example of socialism for the rich. As a matter of irony, the commercial side of this empire has in recent years so overwhelmed its military side in importance that violent action to protect its economic interests increasingly tends to be self-destructive. In other words, we can’t threaten harm to a refractory China without putting our huge investment in China in danger.
  • As a matter of absurdity, this means that world’s most expensive and powerful military, namely ours, can be used only when it doesn’t conflict with our economic interests. That means we can only threaten, bomb or invade countries that don’t mean much to our "national interests." Because of this, the main role of our military has shifted from protecting the empire to protecting itself, chiefly from the threat of budget cuts.
  • 1 our government and media take every advantage of America’s geographical isolation from the rest of the world to ensure that ordinary Americans know little and care less about the other 96 percent of the people on earth. This way, they will remain all but oblivious to the empire for which they pay so much and from which they derive so little.

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